Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

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First view

Steam rises through vents just inside the Park gates.

Rift Zone

Eruptions often come from "rift zones" emanating from the summit caldera down the volcano's flanks. This is Kilauea's Southwestern Rift.

Rift Zone

Looking down the Southwestern Rift.

Rift Zone

Hiking through the Rift.

Volcano Fern

A tiny fern found clinging to the rocks in the Southwestern Rift. I found similar ferns quite frequently in my hikes across Kilauea's lava fields.

Lava Field

Signpost marking a 1974 eruption. I hiked across this lava field to the lip of Halemaumau, the main crater on Kilauea's summit.

Lava Field

Another view of the 1974 eruption site.

Lava Field

Another view of the 1974 eruption site.

Layered Lava

Found on my hike towards Halemaumau, this break in the field makes the rock appear to be sedimentary. Not so - this is the product of many flows overriding each other.

Always Watching

A tracking instrument placed by the Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory near the lip of Halemaumau.

It's Hot In Here

Steam rises from vents near Halemaumau. It made the memory of Yellowstone's sulphur fumes almost pleasant.

Two Rocks, One Flow

Hawaiian volcanoes produce two kinds of lava - A'a and pahoehoe. This photo captures both kinds in one lava field.

Hot Lava!

Looking across the lava fields on the coastline towards Pulama Pali, where an active flow from Pu'u O'o coursed its way down the cliffs.

Hot Lava!

A closer view of the lava flow coming down the cliff at Pulama Pali.

Kilauea Iki

Scene of a memorable "Fountain of Fire" in the 1950s, this crater now quietly steams next door to Halemaumau. Looking across the crater towards the spatter cone created by the lava fountains.

Kilauea Iki

Looking across the crater with Mauna Loa rising in the distance.

Kilauea Iki

The spatter cone rises from the vent at the crater floor.

Ring Around The Collar

The lava pond in Kilauea Iki washed up against the crater walls and cooled, creating "rings" around the crater.

Devastation Trail

Signpost for the hiking trail curving around the back of Kilauea Iki.

Kilauea Iki

Looking down at the main vent from the Devastation Trail.

Spatter Cone

The back side of Kilauea Iki's spatter cone, from Devastation Trail.

Devastation Trail

Looking back towards Mauna Kea.

Kilauea Iki

Hiking across the crater floor of Kilauea Iki.

Kilauea Iki

Looking up at the cliffs from the floor of Kilauea Iki.

Lava Rings

The trail takes you across the "lava rings" at the base of the crater wall. Looking back from the crater floor where the trail comes off the crater wall and crosses the rings.

Kilauea Iki

Looking at the still-steaming vent near the foot of the spatter cone.

Lava Tube

Looking into the Thurston Lava Tube through the Kilauea rainforest.

Lava Tube

Inside the Thurston Lava Tube.

Kilauea Iki

Looking up at the spatter cone from the crater floor.

Kilauea Iki

Looking back at the crater wall where the trail winds its way down to the crater floor.

Kilauea Iki

Looking at the back of the spatter cone from the summit caldera.

Lava Flow

Signpost marking another 1974 lava flow. The trees destroyed by the flow still lie where they fell.

Mauna Ulu

An eruption site along the Chain of Craters Road. Mauna Ulu erupted from 1969 to 1974. The trailhead looks towards the eruption cone across an a'a lava flow.

Mauna Ulu

Signpost marking one of Mauna Ulu's a'a lava flows. I left the trail near here and climbed across the flow to the lava field behind.

Mauna Ulu

The back side of the a'a flow. Clearly something else happened here.

Mauna Ulu

The back side of the a'a flow.

Mauna Ulu

This "mushroom" is made of rock. Found in the lava field behind the 1974 a'a flow.

Mauna Ulu

More interesting rock features in the lava field.

Mauna Ulu

More interesting rock features in the lava field.

Mauna Ulu

End of a pahoehoe lava flow at Mauna Ulu.

Road Closed

The end of Chain of Craters road, where a lava flow from Pu'u O'o cut the road. Since my visit, the spot where I stood has been covered by lava.

Danger!

Signs encountered as I hiked across the Pu'u O'l lava field beyond the end of Chain of Craters Road. Unfortunately lava was not entering the ocean that day, so there was no lava plume. There was plenty of hot lava higher on the field.

Hot Lava!

The second night, again watching the active flow come down Pulama Pali.